Financial Friday 20

Locations: Tbilisi, Stepantsminda [Republic of Georgia]

Week 20 on the road. Here we go….

Transportation

I was mostly in თბილისი (Tbilisi) this week so the only transportation cost was the cable car on Thursday. A couple friends wanted to go to the top of the hill overlooking the city, and we decided to take the fast way up. Overlooking the city at night is pretty cool.

Accommodation

I started at the first Tbilisi hostel (Friday). It was really cool, and I didn’t want to leave but…. One of the owners’ relatives had a conversation with me once that left the impression he wanted me to go out and explore shit during the day (as in not stay at the hostel). That made me feel a little uncomfortable so I did what every good traveler does in that situation: find another hostel.

I booked the second Tbilisi hostel was from Saturday to Monday. The new one is awesome! I liked it so much, I extended through the end of this week’s expense report. The major difference in price is a combination of not having Hostelworld take out a portion, and the receptionist liking me. This is why you should be a good guest: cheaper accommodation.

Food

My food budget varied greatly. The ‘expensive’ days were when I went out with people from the hostel to sit-down places twice a day. The cheaper days are when I had street food for a meal or two. I haven’t been alone enough to go looking for groceries…although street food is actually cheaper than most of the things I could whip up from a grocery store so….

Other

Overpriced travel insurance: $8.64 per day.

On Friday, I had my teeth cleaned: $16.33. I also bought some anti-bacterial mouth wash the dentist ‘prescribed’ me: $7.14. To hear more about my dental experience, check out the blog post. Quick summary: it was awesome!

On Saturday and Thursday, I went to the Tbilisi botanical gardens: $0.82 each time. I went with two different groups of friends, and the price low enough that I don’t mind going multiple times. It’s not as good as the gardens in ქუთაისი (Kutaisi), but they’re still pretty good.

On Monday, I took a tour to სტეფანწმინდა (Stepantsminda): $28.34. It’s called the ‘Kazbegi’ tour since it involves passing Mt. Kazbek, but it actually follows a valley from close to Tbilisi to the town of Stepantsminda. The scenery was amazing, and I got some pretty sweet shots. I should write a post about that….

On Wednesday, I went to the Georgian National Museum: $2.88. The permanent displays cover the history of Georgia beginning around the time Christianity came to the region (4th century AD) through the Soviet occupation years. Being a history nerd, I thought the Soviet years was the best exhibit, but I’m sure other history buffs would disagree with me. It was definitely worth the entrance fee.

Summary

Week 20
Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Total
Travel 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.03 1.03
Lodging 7.93 9.48 9.48 9.48 6.53 6.53 6.53 55.96
Food 4.81 9.39 10.06 16.32 11.53 6.18 16.48 74.77
Other 32.11 9.46 8.64 36.98 8.64 11.52 9.46 116.81
Total 44.85 28.33 28.18 62.78 26.7 24.23 33.5 248.57

Not the cheapest week ever, but it wasn’t bad; especially considering it includes a trip to the dentist. I really like Georgia. I think I’ll stay for a while. Until next week….

2 thoughts on “Financial Friday 20

    1. Yes, that’s the majority of my income. I also get some revenue from personal loans (I’m sort of like a bank), stock market trading, and taking advantage of various perks offered by credit cards.

      I did a relatively good job diversifying before I started traveling, but I’m now searching for opportunities outside the US. While the US economy has been good to me thus far, I’d like a few investments that would be all right in the event of another financial crisis. Hopefully, I’ll be able to share a story about some of that diversification in the next few weeks.

      I’ve also met a couple people out here that have managed to earn enough to live off of while traveling. It’s actually easier than most people think, but still not as simple as finding an employer in your home country. You basically have to be self employed which is a lot trickier for US citizens (if you’re abroad).

      Like

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